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Gruppo D'Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza Edit search Phrase match

 
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CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Group (Gruppo D'Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza)Feed-Back (with bonus CD) ... LP
RCA/Schema (Italy), Early 70s. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
One of the best records ever from the Gruppo D'Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza – an obscure side project of Ennio Morricone and other Italian composers – working here in a freaky, psychedelic setting! The album mixes sonic experiments with fuzzy guitars, freaky keyboards, and some surprisingly funky rhythms at times – at a level that's even more compelling than some of the group's other projects – especially given that the album's three tracks are all quite long, with lots of room for instrumental experimentation! Yet as in some of the best prog work of the period – such as by Can or Faust – there's a sense of focus and groove that really holds the whole thing together. And given that these guys had already had years of experience in the studio – on both sides of the production booth – they really have a wonderful ear for extremely inventive sounds. Titles include "Kumalo", "The Feed-Back", and "Quasars". LP, Vinyl record album
(Includes the album on CD!)
 
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CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Ennio Morricone/Gruppo Improvvisazione NuovaGli Occhi Freddi Della Paura (aka Cold Eyes Of Fear) (180 gram pressing) ... LP
Tiger Bay (UK), 1971. Sealed (reissue)... Out Of Stock
A dark and extremely avant garde soundtrack from the great Ennio Morricone – one that's done in collaboration with his own Gruppo Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza – an ensemble with roots in film scoring, but expressions that are more in the mode of 20th century avant! The music is a blend of free improvisation and more straight ahead jazz – with electric guitar, trumpet, violin, and percussion mixed with lots of weird effects and electronics – much more experimental than some of Morricone's more famous soundtracks of the time, and given a nice sense of direction from conductor Bruno Nicolai. The whole thing's incredibly spooky – one of the most turgid scores we've ever heard from the pen of Morricone – and the titles include "Sequita", "Evaporazione", "Dal Sogno E Ritorno", "Folle Folle", and "Notte E Misteri". LP, Vinyl record album
 
 
 



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