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Orchestra Baobab Edit search Phrase match

 
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Exact matches: 3
Exact matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Orchestra BaobabSi Bou Odja (180 gram pressing) ... LP
Syllart (France), 1981. New Copy (reissue)... $32.99 36.99
An amazing classic from Orchestra Baobab – one of those records that reminds us why the group were always so different than anyone else! Some of the rhythms are familiar, but the execution is very unique – chopped up at times, so that the grooves are a perfect mix for the angular tenor and alto lines form Issa Cissokho, whose saxophone presence here may well be worth the price of admission alone! But all other aspects are great, too – from the sharp-but-snakey guitar solos of Barthelemy Attiso, to the sonorous vocals of the group – sometimes inflected in more of an east African style, but which maybe also belie the group's roots in the crossroads city of Dakar. Titles include "Autorail", "Sibou Odia", "Sotante Xalat", "Bon Bon I", and "Ndiambaane". LP, Vinyl record album
(50th Anniversary limited edition pressing!)

Exact matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Orchestra BaobabSpecialist in All Styles (180 gram pressing) ... LP
World Circuit/Nonesuch, 2002. New Copy 2LP Gatefold ... $28.99 29.99
A great return to form for Orchestra Baobab – a group who really shone on the Senegalese scene in the 70s, but disbanded right as they were hitting global fame – eventually reuniting around the time of this album, thanks to demand from listeners around the world! The style is nicely unadorned here – handled by Youssou D'Dour with Nick Gold of the World Circuit label – in a way that replicates some of the earlier music by the group that was issued by the label, and which helped lead to their reunion! There's maybe a bit less funk than in the 70s, but the rhythms are still nice and sharp, sewn together with lots of great work on guitar – and maturing, heartfelt vocals on tracks that include "Dee Moo Woor", "Sutukun", "Bul Ma Miin", "Gnawoe", "Ndongoy Daara", "Jiin Ma Jinn Ma", and "Hommage A Tonton Ferrer". LP, Vinyl record album
(First time on vinyl!)

Exact matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Orchestra BaobabMouhamadou Bamba ... LP
Syllart (France), 1981. New Copy (reissue)... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A classic album from the best years of Orchestra Baobab – a time when the group were maybe the greatest thing coming out of Dakar, and really helping to move a whole generation of West African sounds forward into new directions! The instrumentation is still relatively old school – no drum programs or beats, just this fantastic blend of quick guitar lines, tenor sax, and plenty of percussion – all topped by back/forth vocals from members of the group, but with an energy that's maybe thinking more globally than locally, with a really wonderful spirit throughout. Titles include "Yen Saay", "Gnawoe", "Doomou Baaye", "Boulmamine", "Mouhamadou Bamba", and "Ndiawolou". LP, Vinyl record album
 
Possible matches: 1
Possible matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousAfrica Boogaloo – The Latinization Of West Africa ... LP
Honest Jons (UK), 1950s/1960s/1970s. New Copy 2LP Gatefold ... Out Of Stock
A long-overdue collection of work – one that really gets at the unusual appearance of Latin rhythms on the African scene of the postwar years! Latin sounds from Africa are nothing new, but they're one of those things that's always taken for granted, too – kind of assumed in most discussions of the rhythms from the 60s onward, but never explained as fully as might be needed! Given the already-great grooves going down on the continent for generations, it's surprising that African musicians might pick up styles from Cuba and the Caribbean – yet due to the vagaries of global cultural circulation, that's exactly what happened – and the music has never been the same ever since. This really well-done package offers up a range of tracks from the 50s through the 70s – showing some of the earliest African extrapolations of Latin styles – clearly enforcing the "Afro" in Afro-Cuban rhythms – then moving onto some later grooves that offer up some funkier styles too. The work's a bridge between the ethnographic sets on Honest Jons, and some of the tighter grooves you might find on a Soul Jazz collection – a wonderful blend of music, packaged beautifully too. Titles include "A Moins Que Namikosa" by Orchestra OK Jazz, "Rampa Rampa" by Orchestre Yaya Mas, "Quiero Wapacha" by Charles Lembe, "Ven Y Ven Y Ven" by Orchestre OK Jazz, "Vamos A Bailar" by Rio Band, "Guantanamo" by Laba Sosseh, "On Verra Ca" by Orchestre Baobab, "Mi Guajeo" by Orchestre N'Guewel, "N'Niyo" by Amara Toure, "Il N'Est Jamais Trop Tard" by Pierre Tchana & Orchestre Poly Rhythmo, "Africa Boogaloo" by Le Grande Kalle with Don Gonzalo & Manu Dibango, and "Adigbedoto" by Gnonnas Pedro. LP, Vinyl record album
 
 
 



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