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Alegria!

LP (Item 9600) Blue Thumb, Early 70s — Condition: Very Good
Gatefold

An incredibly groovy record – and one of two rare sides cut by Bossa Rio – a short-lived vocal group handled by Sergio Mendes! The sound here is kind of an extension of Sergio's work with Brasil 66 – but Bossa Rio have deeper chops vocally, with both male and female singers – and stretch out nicely with a funky samba sound that includes a lot of Lowry organ from Manfredo Fest! Mike Wofford handled the arrangements, and set the group up in a mix of west coast jazz and electric Brazilian rhythms that's totally great – a warm extension of the 60s bossa vocal mode, hipped up slightly for the LA scene! The set includes covers of two great Jorge Ben cuts –"Zazueira" and "Que Pena" – plus great versions of "Girl Talk", "Eleanor Rigby", "Open Your Arms", "Blackbird", and "Spinning Wheel".  © 1996-2019, Dusty Groove, Inc.
(Cover has light wear.)

Very Good

  • Vinyl can have some dirt, but nothing major.
  • May not shine under light, but should still be pretty clean, and not too dirty.
  • May have a number of marks (5 to 10 at most), and obvious signs of play, but never a big cluster of them, or any major mark that would be very deep. Most marks should still not click under a fingernail.
  • May not look near perfect, but should play fairly well, with slight surface noise, and the occasional click in part of a song, but never throughout a whole song or more.
  • This is clearly a copy that was played by someone a number of times, but which could also be a good "play copy" for someone new.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



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