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Laurindo Almeida Quartet – Volume 2 (10 inch)

LP (Item 7629) Pacific Jazz, 1954 — Condition: Near Mint-
$14.99 ...

LP, Vinyl record album

(€12.49 || £11.02 || ¥1667) (approx.)

Original 10" LP featuring the second set of historic duets between Brazilian guitarist Almeida and the great LA alto player Bud Shank. This is the stuff that supposedly ended up back in Brazil and inspired the wave of musicians involved in the bossa nova momement. It's been repackaged a number of times, but it's great to have in this cool original package, with a weird polarized cover featuring a strange green design of intertwining leaves. (Vinyl is in great shape. Cover has some light aging, but is nice overall.)  © 1996-2017, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Near Mint - (minus)

  • Black vinyl that may show a slight amount of dust or dirt.
  • Should still be very shiny under a light, even with slight amount of dust on surface.
  • One or two small marks that would make an otherwise near perfect record slightly less so. These marks cannot be too deep, and should only be surface marks that won't affect play, but might detract from the looks.
  • May have some flaws and discoloration in the vinyl, but only those that would be intrinsic to the pressing. These should disappear when the record is tilted under the light, and will only show up when looking straight at the record. (Buddah and ABC pressings from the 70's are a good example of this.)
  • May have some slight marks from aging of the paper sleeve on the vinyl.
  • Possible minor surface noise when played.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



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