Albert King & Otis Rush : Door To Door (LP, Vinyl record album) -- Dusty Groove is Chicago's Online Record Store
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Door To Door

LP (Item 500611) Chess, 1950s/Early 60s — Condition: Near Mint-
A split album of early recordings by Otis Rush and Albert King – both featured here in early Chicago sides done for Chess Records in the years before their bigger late 60s fame! The style here is mostly stripped down, but still pretty tight – not as rough-edged as some of their Chess contemporaries, and with a fair bit of electric guitar driving most tunes along with a nice little groove. Albert King titles include "Searchin For A Woman", "Bad Luck", "Won't Be Hangin Around", and "Merry Way" – and Otis Rush titles include "So Close", "I Can't Stop", "I'm Satisfied", "So Many Roads", and "All Your Love".  © 1996-2024, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Near Mint - (minus)

  • Black vinyl that may show a slight amount of dust or dirt.
  • Should still be very shiny under a light, even with slight amount of dust on surface.
  • One or two small marks that would make an otherwise near perfect record slightly less so. These marks cannot be too deep, and should only be surface marks that won't affect play, but might detract from the looks.
  • May have some flaws and discoloration in the vinyl, but only those that would be intrinsic to the pressing. These should disappear when the record is tilted under the light, and will only show up when looking straight at the record. (Buddah and ABC pressings from the 70's are a good example of this.)
  • May have some slight marks from aging of the paper sleeve on the vinyl.
  • Possible minor surface noise when played.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



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