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LP (Item 49136) Columbia, 1962 — Condition: Used
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LP, Vinyl record album


Strong work from Bill Doggett – a bit more jazz-based than some of his earlier sides for King, but still with an R&B heavy groove that keeps things real! The group on the album's not credited, but we do know that guitarist Floyd Smith is playing on the session – and the whole thing has a nice smoky feel with a good mix of tenor, organ, and guitar. Titles include "Mommy (parts 1 & 2)", "Deed I Do", "Buster", "Forest Green", "Oops", "Lady's Choice", and a remake of "Honky Tonk". (6 eye pressing. Cover has tape on the spine & light wear.)  © 1996-2017, Dusty Groove, Inc.

We realize that there are many different interpretations of the standard grades used for pre-owned vinyl record albums & CD, so we thought we'd offer you the ones that we are working with, so you have an idea what we mean when we give the grade for a non-new item on our pages.

Used Vinyl Grades

Below are stated conditions for a used vinyl records at Dusty Groove. Grading for the cover should be assumed to be near (within a "+" or "-") the grading for the vinyl. If there is significant divergence from the condition of the vinyl, or specific flaws, these will be noted in the comments section of the item. However, please be aware that since the emphasis of this site is towards the music listener, our main concern is with the vinyl of any used item we sell. Additionally, please note that all of our records are graded visually; considering the volume of used vinyl we handle, it is impossible for us to listen to each record. If we spot any significant flaws, we make every attempt to listen through them and note how they play.

The following grading conditions apply to the vinyl component of an album or single:

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



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