CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Enlarge       Note

Birds Of A Feather

LP (Item 478965) Wayside, Early 70s — Condition: Very Good
$2.99 ...

LP, Vinyl record album

(€2.65 || £2.30 || ¥332) (approx.)

One of the great, slightly twisted slices of pop meets country meets psychedelia meets easy moog grooves from Blanchard & Morgan! We know that's a lot of meeting going on, but this fab guy/girl partnership pushed the boundaries of country & pop conventions in the 60s & 70s like no other! Jack & Misty somehow make moogs and steel guitars make sense on the same record – just as well as they with surreal psych era lyricism paired with plaintive tales of working class woes. And they do it all without it ever dipping into hokum. This album features a dozen great tracks in all, including "Tennessee Bird Walk", "Big Black Bird (Spirit Of My Love)", "Chapel Hill", "The Dum Song", "Bethlehem Steel", "Poor Jody", "Humphrey The Camel", "Yellow Bellied Sap Sucker", "Changin' Times", "The Clock Of St James", "You've Got Your troubles (I've Got Mine)", and "With Pen In Hand". (Cover has light wear.)  © 1996-2017, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Very Good

  • Vinyl can have some dirt, but nothing major.
  • May not shine under light, but should still be pretty clean, and not too dirty.
  • May have a number of marks (5 to 10 at most), and obvious signs of play, but never a big cluster of them, or any major mark that would be very deep. Most marks should still not click under a fingernail.
  • May not look near perfect, but should play fairly well, with slight surface noise, and the occasional click in part of a song, but never throughout a whole song or more.
  • This is clearly a copy that was played by someone a number of times, but which could also be a good "play copy" for someone new.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



You might be interested


Peaceful World
Columbia, 1971. Very Good 2LP Gatefold
Nothing too peaceful here – at least not in a sleepy sort of way – as The Rascals are really hitting on all burners, and starting to mix a bit of funk in with their groove! The record's a great extension of the group's last work on Atlantic – and it takes that already-righteous ... LP, Vinyl record album
Loosen Up Naturally
Capitol, 1969. Very Good 2LP Gatefold
Heavy rocking, with some nice drums – the kind of record that's kept the Sons in more crates than you'd think over the years! The set's a massive 2LP jammer that really overflows with niceness – often done in a heartfelt, blues-tinged rock style that's got traces of Little Feat and The ... LP, Vinyl record album
A&M, 1977. Very Good Gatefold
Includes the great title track – plus "Give A Little Bit", "Fools Overture", and "From Now On". LP, Vinyl record album
Fourth (4)
Columbia, 1970. Very Good+
An almost all-jazz release by Soft Machine – and a tasty bit of proggish tunes with a spare electric modal groove. Robert Wyatt's still on drums, and the rest of the group features Hugh Hopper on bass, Mike Ratledge on organ and piano, and Elton Dean on saxes. Titles include "Teeth" ... LP, Vinyl record album
Bell, 1972. Very Good+ Gatefold
Surprisingly sublime pop from The Partridge Family – served up with superb arrangements from Wes Farrell and Mike Melvoin, the latter of whom plays some really great keyboards on the set! In fact, all the instrumentation is pretty great – guitar from Dennis Budimir and Larry Carlton, ... LP, Vinyl record album
Da Capo
Elektra, 1967. Near Mint-
A stunning second album from Love – a set that's still without the fuller orchestrations and baroque touches of Forever Changes – but which already shows the group moving in that direction! The rough, gritty edge of the group is very firmly intact – but they've already got a ... LP, Vinyl record album
Emitt Rhodes
Dunhill, 1970. Very Good+ Gatefold
A really great self-titled set from Emitt Rhodes – a compelling California singer who hardly ever gets his due! The music's a wonderful mix of California late 60s singer/songwriter modes and bits of Beatles-esque production – a blend that makes for a fuller feel than usual for a record ... LP, Vinyl record album
Decca, 1969. Very Good+
A wonderful bit of sunshine pop from the very obscure Peppermint Rainbow – a male/female harmony group with a sound that was a lot like the Mamas & Papas – blending folk rock and sweet pop into a really sunny groove! The album's worth it alone for the massive title track – ... LP, Vinyl record album
Mountain Live
Windfall, 1972. Very Good-
Sure, Mountain's a rock group by most accounts – and that's where you'll find most of their records in the record store. But from our end, this album always shows up in the crates of hip DJs from way back – clearly for the massive breakbeat classic "Long Red", a monster ... LP, Vinyl record album
I Only Came To Dance With You
Tower, Early/Mid 60s. Very Good
Billed as "The Original Walker Brothers" on the cover, this one features tracks that Scott cut in the US with John Stewart, in the years before he moved to England and became super-huge stars. The tracks have less of that "wall of sound" style than their later work, and more of ... LP, Vinyl record album
Second Album
Motown, 1974. Very Good+
The second album by this obscure rock group who briefly recorded for Motown – and a really great record with some wonderful moments! Puzzle have some nice jazzy touches on their best numbers – slightly funky, and slightly in the jazz-rock mode of groups that were coming out of the UK ... LP, Vinyl record album
Same People
Dunhill, 1970. Near Mint-
Brassy jazzy hard and tight little tracks from this blue-eyed southern soul brother – with production by the great Huey P Meux. The album's core is a rocking southern sound, but there are definitely more soul elements here – and the heavy drums on the set make it super nice and funky! ... LP, Vinyl record album
 



⇑ Top