Scripting is disabled or not working. dustygroove.com requires JavaScript to function correctly.
Style sheets are disabled or not working. dustygroove.com requires style sheets to function correctly.
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Enlarge       Note

Little Niles

LP (Item 21913) United Artists, 1958 — Condition: Very Good+

Some of the greatest work ever recorded by Randy Weston! Forget his trio stuff, this is the material that made him an instant legend in the late 50s! The record's a mindblowing batch of original compositions by Randy, arranged by Melba Liston, and featuring players like Ray Copeland, Johnny Griffin, and Charlie Persip – as well as Randy and Melba themselves. Langston Hughes wrote the liner notes, and the whole thing's so super-hip you won't believe it! Titles include "Babe's Blues", "Little Niles", "Earth Birth", and "Pam's Waltz" – all done in the full-group versions that have an angular, Monk-ish quality – and which represent one of the strongest statements in modern jazz at the end of the 50s! (Vintage Japanese pressing. Back cover has some light wear.)  © 1996-2018, Dusty Groove, Inc.

Very Good + (plus)

  • Vinyl should be very clean, but can have less luster than near mint.
  • Should still shine under a light, but one or two marks may show up when tilted.
  • Can have a few small marks that may show up easily, but which do not affect play at all. Most marks of this quality will disappear when the record is tilted, and will not be felt with the back of a fingernail.
  • This is the kind of record that will play "near mint", but which will have some signs of use (although not major ones).
  • May have slight surface noise when played.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



You might be interested


Blues To Africa
Freedom, 1975. Very Good+
Album of solo tracks recorded in Zurich in 1974, and with a very nice mellow groove. The record's filled with Randy's free-flowing piano lines, has a nice dancing lyrical feel, and lots of African references. Tracks include versions of his classics "Blues to Africa" and "Kucheza ... LP, Vinyl record album
United Artists, 1959. Near Mint-
One of the great lost sessions in the Mingus canon! Mingus leads a sharp small group here, a quintet featuring Booker Ervin, John Handy, Richard Wyands, and Dannie Richmond, of course. The session was recorded live at the Nonagon Gallery in New York, and has that sort of arch-modernist groove ... LP, Vinyl record album
United Artists, 1962. Very Good+
A brilliant album from Kenny Dorham – one of his more far-reaching efforts, with the expansive compositional style that he started bringing to some of his Blue Note work of the early 60s. The record features a group with Jackie McLean on alto, Bobby Timmons on piano, Teddy Smith on bass, and ... LP, Vinyl record album
Brass Shout
United Artists, 1959. Very Good
A great little album by this wonderful trumpeter – and one that we passed up for years because we were afraid of the words "brass" and "shout" in the title! If you're a Farmer fan, though, don't worry about this being some sort of snoozy "bold n brassy" session ... LP, Vinyl record album
Paris Blues – Original Soundtrack
United Artists, 1961. Very Good
We've always loved Duke Ellington's soundtracks, and this is one of his best! The score is a moody introspective one, written for a 1961 film that starred Paul Newman as a frustrated jazz musician living in Paris. The "Paris Blues" theme is a dark, somber composition that is supposedly ... LP, Vinyl record album
United Artists, 1959. Very Good
A rare Latin outing from trumpeter Art Farmer – one that has him working with the mighty Cuban arranger Chico O'Farrill! The grooves here are hardly "Aztec", as Chico brings a hip postwar vibe to the session – a blend of American jazz and Latin rhythms that's totally great, ... LP, Vinyl record album
Bags' Opus
United Artists, 1959. Very Good
One of the greatest Milt Jackson albums ever – thanks to an incredible lineup that features Art Farmer on trumpet and Benny Golson on tenor – both of whom give the record a lot more edge than usual for Jackson! The set's almost a maturation of the earliest modern grooves that Milt ... LP, Vinyl record album
Patterns
United Artists, 1960. Very Good+
Nice moody stuff from the MJQ – featuring a number of longish tracks with kind of a haunting soundtrack quality to them. In fact, most of these cuts (we think) appeared on the soundtrack to the film Odds Against Tomorrow, but are redone here by the band in new versions. Titles include " ... LP, Vinyl record album
Herbie Mann's African Suite
United Artists, 1962. Good+
A confusing title, but a wonderful little record! The album's as much a Herbie Mann Latin session as it is a record by Johnny Rae – which is probably why the album's titled as such – and the group on the set features Rae on vibes, Herbie on flute, Jack Six on bass, Philly Joe Jones on ... LP, Vinyl record album
Coltrane Time
United Artists, 1958. Very Good
This is a repackaged version of an album that was originally issued under Cecil Taylor's name, under the title Hard Drive (and later Stereo Drive, or something like that). The record brings together two of the late 50's most promising modernists – Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane – in a ... LP, Vinyl record album
Some Like It Hot Cha Cha Cha
United Artists, 1959. Near Mint-
An unusual record – a combo of trad jazz tunes and cha cha rhythms – put together in support of the film Some Like It Hot! LP, Vinyl record album
Consequence
Blue Note, 1965/1979. Near Mint-
A great slice from Jackie McLean's rare unissued 60s sessions for Blue Note – a rollingly soulful session that stands in stark contrast to some of his more modern sides of the time! The set's got Jackie working with a group that includes Lee Morgan on trumpet and Harold Mabern on piano ... LP, Vinyl record album
 



⇑ Top