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Miles Davis Vol 1 (Blue Note 1501)

LP (Item 18863) Blue Note, Early 50s — Condition: Very Good+
Also available
Miles Davis — Miles Davis Vol 1 (Japanese paper sleeve edition) ... CD 19.99

Brilliant early work by Miles Davis – some of his first truly important sessions to appear under his own name, recorded with players that include Jimmy Heath, JJ Johnson, Gil Coggins, Art Blakey, Kenny Clarke, Jackie McLean, and Oscar Pettiford. Tunes are shorter, and perhaps more boppish, than you might expect from some of Miles' other 50s work – but in a way that still allows for many moments of lyrical beauty, and that brilliantly cool sound of his which forever changed the sound of jazz trumpet. Titles include "Tempus Fugit", "Kelo", "Enigma", "Ray's Ida", and "CTA".  © 1996-2020, Dusty Groove, Inc.
(70s white "b" pressing. Cover has light wear.)

Very Good + (plus)

  • Vinyl should be very clean, but can have less luster than near mint.
  • Should still shine under a light, but one or two marks may show up when tilted.
  • Can have a few small marks that may show up easily, but which do not affect play at all. Most marks of this quality will disappear when the record is tilted, and will not be felt with the back of a fingernail.
  • This is the kind of record that will play "near mint", but which will have some signs of use (although not major ones).
  • May have slight surface noise when played.

Additional Marks & Notes

If something is noteworthy, we try to note it in the comments — especially if it is an oddity that is the only wrong thing about the record. This might include, but isn't limited to, warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage or wear as noted above, or strictly cosmetic flaws.



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