All Categories — All

$



Items/page

Willie Walker Edit search Phrase match

 
Sort by
Possible matches: 5
Possible matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousMemphis 70 – The City's Funk & Soul In The Decade After Otis 1968 to 1977 ... CD
BGP (UK), Late 60s/1970s. Used ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A mind-expanding look at Memphis soul – one that gets way past common cliches about the city and its music! There's a heavy dose of funk in the mix on most numbers here – a gritty, fuzzy approach to the music that seems slightly borrowed from the Detroit scene at the end of the 60s – then mixed with some rougher, rootsier southern soul styles too! But other tracks take on a more sophisticated sound too – some of the righteous elements that hit Stax in the post-1968 period, especially as Isaac Hayes and David Porter were working on their own great solo work. Yet unlike Hayes and Porter, most of the artists here are much lesser-known – singers and groups who never charted big, but who got the chance to record for Memphis labels like XL, Stax, Select-O-Hits, and Sounds Of Memphis. CD features 20 tracks in all – and titles include "Dig It" by The Optimistics, "Mississippi Mud" by Smithsonian, "Two Paces Ahead Of Love" by Willie Walker, "Pullin" by The Minits, "It's Bump Time" by Gene Bowlegs Miller, "Blackrock Yeah Yeah" by Blackrock, "Keep The Faith" by Mel & Tim, "Watch Dog (alt)" by Barbara & The Browns, "Come What May" by John Gary Williams, "Strange Things" by Art Jerry Miller, "Shake" by The Ovations, "Tip Toeing" by Alvin Cash, "The Way Of Me" by Hannon, "Take A Giant Step" by LaCleve Milon, "Papa Killed A Chicken" by Willie Toliver, and "Don't Boom Boom" by Lillian Hale. CD

Possible matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousTwin Cities Funk & Soul – Lost R&B Grooves From Minneapolis/St Paul 1964 to 1979 ... CD
Secret Stash, 1960s/1970s. Used ... Out Of Stock
Rare soul from Minneapolis – a surprisingly great source for grooves in the years before Prince and Morris Day! Turns out, the Twin Cities were already funky, way before the Purple One came into being – as you'll hear in this wealth of rare singles from the late 60s on up through the 70s – all of them mighty darn soulful, and most of them pretty dang funky as well! The wealth of work is really surprisingly – with strong echoes of styles going on in the Chicago and Detroit scenes at the time, but maybe even more surprising, given that Minneapolis/St Paul didn't have nearly the same amount of resources. The package is easily one of the best ever done by the Secret Stash label – a set that really ups the level of their reissues – with a motherlode of killer cuts that include "Love Me Leave Me" by The Valdons, "Sweet Smell Of Perfume" by Maurice McKinnies & The Champions, "Work Your Flapper (part 1)" by Jackie Harris & The Champions, "She's A Whole Lot's A Woman" by Mojo & His Chi 4, "I Ain't Gonna Cheat On You No More" by Willie Walker, "Save Me" by Wanda Davis, "Saxophone Disco" by Morris Wilson, "Honey From The Bee" by Willie & The Bumblebees, "The Max" by Prophets Of Peace, "Get Up" by The Lewis Connection, and "Rusty McDusty" by Morris Wilson. CD
(Out of print.)

Possible matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousGoldwax Story Vol 2 ... CD
Goldwax/Kent (UK), 1960s. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
Incredible work from one of the greatest deep soul labels ever – the legendary Goldwax Records, a smaller company that languished in the shadows of Stax and Hi Records during their glory years! Like so many small labels in cities that were important to soul music, Goldwax seemed to have an amazing talent for picking up all the bits that Stax and Hi left behind – recording artists who were every bit as good as the bigger stars from Memphis, but who also seemed to benefit even more from the personal sound, and richer recording quality they got from the label. The most legendary figure to record for Goldwax was James Carr, and the work on this set follows very much in Carr's tradition – a deeply burning, extremely heartfelt approach to southern soul – one that even leaves some of the bigger names of the scene in the dust! The set features 24 tracks in all, including a number of unreleased tracks – and it's packaged with a great set of notes on this legendary imprint! Titles include "I Never Loved A Woman" by Spencer Wiggins, "Crying Baby Baby Baby" by Percy Milem, "Welcome Home Baby" by Barbara Perry, "Peace Of Mind" by The Ovations, "Country Style" by Dorothy Williams, "Good Times" by George & Greer, "Toddlin" by Gene Bowlegs Miller, "I Ain't Gonna Cheat On You No More" by Wee Willie Walker, "When You Look In The Mirror" by Eddie Jefferson, "The Side Wind" by The Lyrics, "Darling" by The Vel Tones, and "A Man Needs A Woman" by OB McClinton. CD

Possible matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
VariousAmerican Folk Blues Festival – Live In Paris 20 Octobre 1962 (3CD set) ... CD
Fremeaux & Associates (France), 1962. New Copy 3 CDs ... $18.99 29.99
A beautifully-recorded concert from early 60s Paris – one done as part of the legendary folk-blues tour, and featuring a great selection of musicians, all with introductions from Memphis Slim! Slim's a hell of an MC for the event, and really provides this warm context that seems to open up the singers and musicians – who play here in a style that's every bit as crucial and faithfully handled as some of the early 60s blues performances at Newport – with none of the fake modes you might fear from a performance of blues for European audiences. The 3CD package seems to capture the entire concert, even in the way that Memphis Slim helps move from artist to artist – and in addition to solo performances by John Lee Hooker, Shakey Jake, Willie Dixon, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, T Bone Walker, and Helen Humes – there's also a few numbers by the full ensemble of singers too. CD

Possible matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Webster LewisLet Me Be The One ... LP
Epic, 1981. Used ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A jazzy soul masterpiece from Webster Lewis – light years away from the rougher funk he cut at the start of the 70s! The album's beautifully put together – almost perfect at all points, at a level that we'd rank right up there with the best work by Leroy Hutson, Roy Ayers, or other contemporary maestros in the studio. Unlike some of the more commercial artists of his generation – who also came to soul through jazz – Webster doesn't push the hooks too hard, nor try too much for a hit. And instead, he's more than happy to stay in his own righteous space – with a sound that's smooth, but never slick – tight, but not uptight. He's got some great help on the record – including keyboards from Herbie Hancock and Skip Scarborough, guitar from David T Walker, and percussion from Willie Bobo – all of whom keep things cool. Vocals are handled by a number of singers, including Webster himself – and titles include "Bout The Love", "Let Me Be The One", "Love Won't Harm No One", "El Bobo", "Kemo Kemo", "A Quiet Thing", and "Flying High". LP, Vinyl record album
 
 
 



⇑ Top