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✨✧ VariousInternational New Jazz Meeting – Burg Altena 1972 to 1973 (8CD set) ... CD
Be! (Germany), 1972/1973. New Copy 8CD ... Out Of Stock
A double-whammy of a package – one that's like attending a totally hip festival of avant jazz, and finding a time machine to take you there in the process! This overstuffed box brings together recordings from two years' worth of the Burg Altena International New Jazz Meeting in Germany – 4CDs from 1972, and 4 from 1973 – packaged in a very cool box that features loads of photos, and reprints of pages from the programs to both festivals too! But the music here is what really matters – as the performances are all long, often freely improvised, and usually much more way-out than the material you'd hear from any of these players on record. Plus, the choice of musicians is quite unique – some familiar faces from the European underground, but also some real surprises, too – at a level that makes this collection a bit different than others of its nature. The 1972 discs features full sets by Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath, a quintet led by keyboardist Wolfgang Dauner with guitarist Attila Zoller, reedman Phil Woods European Rhythm Machine with Gordon Beck on electric piano, a duet between Jan Frederyk Dobrowolski on piano and Jacec Bednarek on bass, a quintet led by reedman/violinist Michal Urbaniak with Urszula Dudziak on voice and Adam Makowicz on electric piano, a quartet led by vibist/pianist Karl Berger with Ingrid Berger on voice and Peter Kowald on bass, and the Scandinavia New Jazz Group – with Bobo Stenson on electric piano, Lennart Aberg on tenor, Kjell Westling on soprano sax, Palle Danielsson on bass, and Bengt Berger on drums. 1973 is equally exciting – a performance of the fantastic Anima trio with Paul Fuchs on reeds, Limpe Fuchs on drums and voice, and Friedrich Gulda on acoustic and electric piano; a quintet led by trumpeter Terumasa Hino with Mikio Masuda on piano and Motohiko Hino on drums; the Theo Loevendie Consort, with Theo on alto and soprano, Hans Dulfer on tenor and flute, Martin Altena on bass, and Leo Cuypers on piano; Tune For Bassclarinets with the named instrument played by the quartet of Gunter Hampel, Willem Breuker, Michel Pilz, and Jef Sicard; and the Reform Art Unit, which includes Franz Kogelmann on trumpet, Fritz Novotny on reeds, Sepp Mitterbauer on pocket and regular trumpet, and Giselherr Smekal on organ and piano. Hours of music – and a wonderful package overall! CD

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CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Theo LoevendieMandela/Chess ... CD
MCN (Netherlands), 1969/1972. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
Two rare albums from Dutch reedman Theo Loevendie – both amazing little records that sound beautiful here on a single CD! Mandela features complicated lines from a hip Netherlands combo of the late 60s – one headed up by Theo Loevendie on alto sax, but which acts a lot more like a collective of modernists working together – Hans Dulfer on tenor and bamboo flute, Willem Van Manen on trombone, Nedly Elstak on trumpet, Joop Mastenbroek on baritone and clarinet, Maarten Altena on bass, and Martin Van Dunhoven and John Engels on drums. The tunes all have a nice sense of structure – energy that's more like the early 60s modernism of the European scene – particularly some of the more rhythmic styles – than the looser freedoms that some of Loevendie's contemporaries were hitting at the same time. There's definitely plenty of offbeat sounds in the mix – but the group also knows how to swing, too – on titles that include "Trombomanie", "Mr Brook", "Timbuktu", "Trompedly", and "Pepy". Chess is a really playful outing from a very cool Dutch combo – one with lead alto from Theo Loevendie, but a rich array of sounds from the other members too! The reeds are especially nice – often coming together with a complexity that goes back to older European modern traditions, yet with a swinging sensibility that's still plenty jazz, too – kind of a mix of composition, arrangement, and inherent swinging – with standout work from Hans Dulfer on tenor, Leon Van Oostrom on baritone, Leo Cuypers on piano, and Willem Van Manen on trombone – a player we barely know at all, but whose bold tones really bring a lot to the record. Titles include "Lapsang Souchong", "Scratch", "Brasilia", and "Tremolo". CD
 
 
 



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