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John Mayall Edit search Phrase match

 
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Exact matches: 7
Exact matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John MayallTurning Point ... LP
Polydor, 1969. Very Good+ ... $5.99
... LP, Vinyl record album

Exact matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
John Mayall's BluesbreakersBroadcast 65 EP (2017 Record Store Day Release) ... 7-inch
1960s (UK), New Copy (pic cover, reissue)... On April 22, 2017
(Note: This item is not for sale online until after the opening of business on Sunday, April 23. It is in limited supply – and by nature of the Record Store Day rules it will be offered for sale first to customers who visit the Dusty Groove retail outlet in Chicago on Record Store Day. It will not be pre-sold or reserved in any way. However, the day after Record Store Day we will offer up whatever we have left for sale online.) 7-inch, Vinyl record
(Limited to just 250 copies in the US!)

Exact matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John MayallBack To The Roots ... LP
Polydor, 1971. Used 2LP Gatefold ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
John Mayall's definitely getting back to his roots here – and he's also getting help from an all-star cast as well! Mayall's vocals and piano are in fine form – almost with a rough-edged Blues Breakers sort of vibe, but sometimes a bit funkier too – in ways that strongly show the evolution of the older Brit blues groove into some hipper, more soul-drenched territory. Players on the record are a range of familiar names – including Eric Clapton on guitar, Johnny Amond on sax and flute, Harvey Mandel on guitar, Sugarcane Harris on violin, and Keef Hartley on some especially nice drums. Titles include "Prisons On The Road", "Groupie Girl", "My Children", "Home Again", "Blue Fox", "Boogie Albert", "Unanswered Questions", "Goodbye December", "Force Of Nature", and "Dream With Me". CD also features bonus tracks too – including "Accidental Suicide (1988 rmx)", "Force Of Nature (1988 rmx)", "Boogie Albert (1988 rmx)", "Television Eye (1988 rmx)", "Looking At Tomorrow (1988 rmx)", "Mr Censor Man (1988 rmx)", and "Home Again (1988 rmx)". LP, Vinyl record album
(Includes booklet. Cover has light wear & a cut corner.)

Exact matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John MayallBlues Alone ... LP
London, 1967. Used ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A real shift in sound for John Mayall – as the album lives up to its title, and mostly features solo work from the artist! Through the magic of overdubbing, Mayall's singing here along with his own work on organ, harmonica, and guitar – and apart from some brief additional drum work from Keef Hartley, most tracks here have a relatively spare sound overall – bluesier and rootsier than even the previous Blues Breakers albums! As you might expect, Mayall sounds great in the setting – and titles include "Down The Line", "No More Tears", "Harp Man", "Broken Wings", "Cancelling Out", "Don't Kick Me", and "Sonny Boy Blow". LP, Vinyl record album
(US pressing. Cover has some ring & edge wear.)

Exact matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John MayallNo More Interviews ... LP
DJM, 1979. Used ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
... LP, Vinyl record album

Exact matches6
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John MayallUSA Union ... LP
Polydor, 1970. Used Gatefold ... Out Of Stock
Definitely a USA union from John Mayall – given that he's got great American work here from Harvey Mandel on guitar and Don Sugarcane Harris on violin! LP, Vinyl record album

Exact matches7
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ John Mayall's Blues BreakersHard Road ... LP
Deram, 1967. Used ... Out Of Stock
A killer album from one of the most legendary versions of John Mayall's Blues Breakers – a quartet that features drummer Aynsley Dunbar, bassist John McVie, and lead guitarist Peter Green – who's also singing a fair bit on the album as well! The style here is tighter and more focused than before – showing a bit more of a rockish bent, especially on the guitars – but still strongly drenched in American R&B traditions, served up in a way that never waters down the sound for a mainstream audience. While other UK artists were taking American roots and softening them up for the charts, Mayall only seemed to deepen his commitment to more authentic representation of the styles – really only taking a bit more liberties with the strength and length of guitar parts. As before, there's a bit of reed work here that's especially nice – served up by UK jazzers Ray Warleigh, John Almond, and Alan Skidmore – and titles include "A Hard Road", "It's Over", "The Stumble", "Dust My Blues", "There's Always Work", "The Same Way", "The Supernatural", and "Living Alone". LP, Vinyl record album
(Later UK Decca pressing, matrix ending in 2W.)
 
Possible matches: 2
Possible matches8
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousLegends Of Guitar – Electric Blues Vol 2 ... CD
Rhino, 1950s/1960s. Used ... $2.99
Includes tracks by BB King, John Lee Hooker, Magic Sam Blues Band, Freddie King, John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Muddy Waters, Lowell Fulson, Snooks Eaglin, and Howlin' Wolf. CD
(Out of print.)

Possible matches9
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Blue MitchellBlue's Blues ... CD
Mainstream/Solid (Japan), Early 70s. New Copy ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
Sweet soulful work from trumpeter Blue Mitchell – a set that has him working with a slightly large group of players, but in a style that's always very much in the groove! There's a nice electric undercurrent to the record throughout – sometimes in the instrumentation from other players, sometimes in the overall way the grooves are put together – which gives the record a quality that's almost like a funky soundtrack at the best moments! The lineup is a bit weird, too – with Joe Sample on keyboards, Freddy Robinson on guitar, Herman Riley on tenor and flute, and even John Mayall on harmonica – playing with a vamping funky edge on a few tunes! The title track – "Blues Blues" – is a great little jazzy break number, and other tracks include "Granite & Concrete", "Casa Blues", and "I Didn't Ask To Be". CD
 
 
 



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