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Exact matches: 3
Exact matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Freddy RobinsonAt The Drive-In ... LP
Enterprise, 1972. Very Good- ... $6.99
An excellent album of super-dope guitar riffing – laid down over funky arrangements by Monk Higgins, in kind of a slick LA early 70s style. The group features work by Paul Humphrey, Joe Sample, and Wilton Felder – but the real star is Freddy, whose complicated lines on the guitar stand up there with some of the best slow funk masters of the 70s, like Little Beaver or Shuggie Otis. Tracks include "Creepin' Lightly", "I Found My Soul Last Night", "Miss Black America", "It's The Real Thing", and "Wonder What It Is". Nice laidback feel, with some excellent funky guitar! LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has some wear, a promo sticker, and wide clear tape on the top & bottom seams.)

Exact matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Freddy RobinsonBlack Fox (aka The Coming Atlantis) ... LP
World Pacific, Late 60s. Very Good- Gatefold ... $9.99
A sweet album of funky guitar tracks, with Freddy Robinson out front over a bunch of tight LA Monk Higgins arrangements. Kind of a sleeper that hasn't really gotten as many props in the groove scene as it ought to, with a great sunny west coast 60s soul jazz vibe running throughout. Joe Sample provides warm keys, Paul Humphrey is snapping nicely on the drums, and the group kicks on tracks like "Before Six", "Black Fox", and "Monkin Around". LP, Vinyl record album

Exact matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Freddy RobinsonComing Atlantis (aka Black Fox) ... LP
World Pacific, Late 60s. Very Good- Gatefold ... $8.99
A sweet album of funky guitar tracks, with Freddy Robinson out front over a bunch of tight LA Monk Higgins arrangements. Kind of a sleeper that hasn't really gotten as many props in the groove scene as it ought to, with a great sunny west coast 60s soul jazz vibe running throughout. Joe Sample provides warm keys, Paul Humphrey is snapping nicely on the drums, and the group kicks on tracks like "Before Six", "Black Fox", and "Monkin Around". LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has some wear and splitting.)
 
Possible matches: 5
Possible matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Blue MitchellBantu Village ... CD
Blue Note/Soul Brother (UK), 1969. New Copy ... $16.99
One of the funkiest albums ever on Blue Note – a set that mixes the trumpet talents of Blue Mitchell with some killer backings from Monk Higgins – all in a groove that more gritty edges than the best funky soundtracks of the time! Higgins keeps the backings full, but always quite lean – fusing all elements together into a sharp, tight rhythm that steps along with some of the slight African touches you might guess from the title – a groove that's not really that authentic, but which resonates with some of the best inspirations that Hugh Masekela was bringing to American music at the time. And while the album might be an attempt to cash in on Masekela's groove, the feel here is really quite different overall – as tracks are nicely stretched out, with plenty of room for jazzy solo work – and a groove that's much harder overall, thanks to Higgins! Other players include Freddy Robinson on guitar, Wilton Felder on bass, Paul Humphrey on drums, and Plas Johnson on tenor – and titles include "HNIC", "Flat Backing", "Na Ta Ka", "Bantu Village", and "Blue Dashiki". CD

Possible matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Three SoundsSoul Symphony ... LP
Blue Note, 1969. Good+ ... $14.99
The mighty Monk Higgins works some amazing magic here with the Three Sounds – taking them way past their standard trio modes of the 60s, into some really funky territory overall! The set's a definite symphony of soul – not just because the first side features a super-extended, suite-like tune – but also because all of the tracks feature fuller backings from Higgins, which really push the piano groove of the group! Drums are mighty heavy at points – thanks to trio member Carl Burnett – and the great Henry Franklin is in the group on bass, already crafting those wicked lines that would show up even more strongly on his albums for Black Jazz. In addition to flute from Buddy Collette, guitar from Freddy Robinson, and Gene Harris' super-heavy piano, there's also a bit of strings, and some slight backing vocals in the symphony from a trio that features Alex Brown, Mamie Galore, and Clydie King. The "Soul Symphony" cut runs for 26 minutes on side one – and other tracks include "Popsicle Pimp", "Repeat After Me", "Black Sugar", and "Upper Four Hundred". LP, Vinyl record album
(Liberty pressing.)

Possible matches6
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
VariousShattered Dreams – Funky Blues 1967 to 1978 ... CD
BGP (UK), Late 60s/1970s. New Copy ... $15.99
Funky blues treasures from the late 60s & early 70s – a once-scoffed at movement from a period when aging blues stars and purist blues fans alike were hesitant to accept their beloved style modernized in a funky fashion – but the best of it stands up today as some of the coolest and most unique funk, blues and soul of the era! BGP does a terrific job here of digging a bit deeper then some the more famous blues funk fusions, with numbers by Slim Green, Al King, Icewater Slim, Little Milton, The Johnny Otis Show, Al King, Big Daddy Rucker, Buddy Guy and more. 21 tracks in all: "Shake 'Em Up" by Slim Green, "It Took A Long Time" by Finis Tasby, "I'm Not The Best" by Buddy Guy, "Tough Competition" by Ray Agee, "Eli's Pork Chop" by Little Sonny, "Playing On Me" by Albert King, "Good Feeling" by Freddy Robinson, "Welcome Home" by Lowell Fulson, "Comin' At Ya Baby" by The Johnny Otis Show, "That's What Love Will Make You Do" by Little Milton and more. CD

Possible matches7
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Blue MitchellBantu Village ... LP
Blue Note, 1969. Used ... Out Of Stock
One of the funkiest albums ever on Blue Note – a set that mixes the trumpet talents of Blue Mitchell with some killer backings from Monk Higgins – all in a groove that more gritty edges than the best funky soundtracks of the time! Higgins keeps the backings full, but always quite lean – fusing all elements together into a sharp, tight rhythm that steps along with some of the slight African touches you might guess from the title – a groove that's not really that authentic, but which resonates with some of the best inspirations that Hugh Masekela was bringing to American music at the time. And while the album might be an attempt to cash in on Masekela's groove, the feel here is really quite different overall – as tracks are nicely stretched out, with plenty of room for jazzy solo work – and a groove that's much harder overall, thanks to Higgins! Other players include Freddy Robinson on guitar, Wilton Felder on bass, Paul Humphrey on drums, and Plas Johnson on tenor – and titles include "HNIC", "Flat Backing", "Na Ta Ka", "Bantu Village", and "Blue Dashiki". LP, Vinyl record album
(Original Liberty stereo pressing. Cover has light wear and a small cut corner.)
Also available Bantu Village ... CD 16.99

Possible matches8
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Blue MitchellBlue's Blues ... LP
Mainstream, 1972. Used Gatefold ... Out Of Stock
Sweet soulful work from trumpeter Blue Mitchell – a set that has him working with a slightly large group of players, but in a style that's always very much in the groove! There's a nice electric undercurrent to the record throughout – sometimes in the instrumentation from other players, sometimes in the overall way the grooves are put together – which gives the record a quality that's almost like a funky soundtrack at the best moments! The lineup is a bit weird, too – with Joe Sample on keyboards, Freddy Robinson on guitar, Herman Riley on tenor and flute, and even John Mayall on harmonica – playing with a vamping funky edge on a few tunes! The title track – "Blues Blues" – is a great little jazzy break number, and other tracks include "Granite & Concrete", "Casa Blues", and "I Didn't Ask To Be". LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has some splitting at the spine with clear tape.)
 
 
 



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