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Latin

XWe're especially heavy on New York sounds of the 60s and 70s -- Latin Soul, salsa, boogaloo, and more!

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Possible matches: 5
Possible matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Joe BataanAfrofilipino (with bonus tracks) ... CD
Salsoul/Octave (Japan), 1975. New Copy ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
An amazing crossover moment of the 70s Latin scene! During the 60s Joe Bataan had been experimenting with the many different mode of Latin Soul – crossing over styles in a way that not only reflected his complicated roots, but which also tried to break Latin music out of the small uptown market it was getting locked into. On the album before this one, Joe coined the term Salsoul, which he used to describe his unique mix of salsa and soul – which on this record also gets a bit of an infusion of disco, which was a brilliant move by Joe, and broke the album out of the ghetto, onto dancefloors around the world. The centerpiece of the record is Joe's funky cover of Gil Scott-Heron's classic "The Bottle" – but just about every track is great, and there's loads of excellent titles like "Chico & The Man", "Women Don't Want To Love Me", "X-Rated Symphony", "When You're Down (Funky Mambo)", and remakes of older Latin Soul tunes "What Good Is A Castle" and "Ordinary Guy". CD features bonus tracks – "What Good Is A Castle (parts 1 & 2)", "Ordinary Guy", and "Women Don't Want To Love Me". CD
(Part of the Salsoul Records Original Master Collecion!)

Possible matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Eddie Drennon & BBS UnlimitedCollage ... CD
Friends & Co, 1975. Used ... $11.99
A 70s New York classic – the first and best album by Eddie Drennon! Eddie's got a unique sound that's part soul and part Latin – grooving here in a Latin Hustle mode that brings together gliding strings, floating chorus vocals, and a heavier funk-based set of rhythms that really kicks up the groove! Club diva Esther Williams is one of the singers in the group, and the mix of strings and funk is completely sublime throughout! Great cuts include the heavily funky (and often sampled) "Theme In Search", which has a very dark groove that we can't get enough of, and the club classic "Do What You Gotta Do" – but there's also loads of other nice ones, like "Let's Do It Again", "Please Stay Please Stay", and "Get Down, Do The Latin Hustle". (Soul, Latin) CD
(Out of print and still sealed.)

Possible matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
El ChiclesViva Tirado ... CD
Polydor/Pregador Do Som (Germany), 1970. New Copy ... $8.99 16.99
A funky killer from this legendary European group – a record that's filled with as much funk and soul as the Latin elements you might have guessed from the title! El Chicles may have been a studio project, but they were a heck of a funky one – with hard drums, tight bass, and mixed-up Latin funky groove that was always pretty right on, no matter what the material happened to be! This cold little jammer from the early 70s features the group riffing hard on funky covers of "Viva Tirado", "Ode To Billy Joe", and "I'm A Man" – and grooving even better on the original tracks "Drug Bay" and the break-heavy "At Nee-Ko". There's some excellent organ in the mix, and the whole thing's packaged in a very cheesy cover! (Soul, Latin) CD

Possible matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Pucho & The Latin Soul BrothersSaffron & Soul/Shuckin & Jivin ... CD
Prestige/BGP (UK), 1966/1967. New Copy ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A double-header to die for – two of the rarest albums from Pucho & The Latin Soul Brothers – back to back on a single CD! First up is Saffron & Soul – one of the first albums from the legendary Pucho & The Latin Soul Brothers – a wonderful little record that evenly blends together jazz, Latin, and soul music! There's a stronger soul jazz vibe here than on some later Pucho sets – partly due to the strong use of jazz in the rhythms, but also to the record's excellent horn work – not by the Pazant Brothers, but by Harold Alexander on tenor and flute, Claude Bartee on tenor, and Vicent McEwan on trumpet – all players who really make the record sparkle! The set's heavy on vibes too – a Pucho trademark, played here by Willie Bivins – and titles include the excellent "Soul Yamie", plus "Something Black", "The Groover", "Caravan", "Aye Ma Ma", and "What A Piece". Shuckin & Jivin is one of the most soulful albums ever recorded by Pucho & The Latin Soul Brothers – a set that really shows the changing sound of Latin music in the late 60s – with some fresh vocals added to the group by Jackie Soul! Jackie only sings on a few cuts, but really brings in a raw Spanish Harlem vibe – one that gives the set a bit more of a Fania/Cotique sort of groove than usual – even when the group are leaping ahead on tight instrumentals – tunes that really sparkle with piano from Neal Creque, vibes from Willy Bivens, and tenor sax from Claude Bartee! Vocal gems include "Shuckin & Jivin", "CC Rider", and "You Are My Sunshine" – instrumental tracks include "Return To Me", "Swing Thing", "Maiden Voyage", and "How Insensitive". CD

Possible matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
VariousAfrica Boogaloo – The Latinization Of West Africa ... LP
Honest Jons (UK), 1950s/1960s/1970s. New Copy 2LP Gatefold ... $24.99
A long-overdue collection of work – one that really gets at the unusual appearance of Latin rhythms on the African scene of the postwar years! Latin sounds from Africa are nothing new, but they're one of those things that's always taken for granted, too – kind of assumed in most discussions of the rhythms from the 60s onward, but never explained as fully as might be needed! Given the already-great grooves going down on the continent for generations, it's surprising that African musicians might pick up styles from Cuba and the Caribbean – yet due to the vagaries of global cultural circulation, that's exactly what happened – and the music has never been the same ever since. This really well-done package offers up a range of tracks from the 50s through the 70s – showing some of the earliest African extrapolations of Latin styles – clearly enforcing the "Afro" in Afro-Cuban rhythms – then moving onto some later grooves that offer up some funkier styles too. The work's a bridge between the ethnographic sets on Honest Jons, and some of the tighter grooves you might find on a Soul Jazz collection – a wonderful blend of music, packaged beautifully too. Titles include "A Moins Que Namikosa" by Orchestra OK Jazz, "Rampa Rampa" by Orchestre Yaya Mas, "Quiero Wapacha" by Charles Lembe, "Ven Y Ven Y Ven" by Orchestre OK Jazz, "Vamos A Bailar" by Rio Band, "Guantanamo" by Laba Sosseh, "On Verra Ca" by Orchestre Baobab, "Mi Guajeo" by Orchestre N'Guewel, "N'Niyo" by Amara Toure, "Il N'Est Jamais Trop Tard" by Pierre Tchana & Orchestre Poly Rhythmo, "Africa Boogaloo" by Le Grande Kalle with Don Gonzalo & Manu Dibango, and "Adigbedoto" by Gnonnas Pedro. (Global Grooves, Latin) LP, Vinyl record album
 
 
 



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