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Possible matches: 7
Possible matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Lightnin HopkinsLightnin Strikes (Vee Jay) ... LP
Vee Jay, 1962. Near Mint- (reissue)... $14.99
Prime Vee Jay blues from the mighty Lightnin Hopkins – a real back-to-basics session that features more acoustic guitar than electric, in a style that's quite spare and down-home – a real difference from most of the other work of this type on the label! Often, Hopkins is singing along with just his guitar for backing – and the recording approach has an oddly echoey quality that amplifies the dark corners nicely. Electric numbers include "War Is Starting Again" and "Got Me A Louisiana Woman" – and other tracks include "Please Don't Quit Me", "Want To Come Home", "Rolling & Rolling", "Heavy Snow", "Coon Is Hard To Catch", and "Walkin Round In Circles". LP, Vinyl record album
(180 gram Get Back pressing, still in the original plastic sleeve, with some stickers.)

Possible matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Howlin WolfHowlin Wolf/Moanin In The Moonlight – Two In One ... CD
Chess, 1959. New Copy ... $4.99 9.98
2 blues classics from the great Howlin Wolf – back to back on a single CD! First up is the self-titled Howlin Wolf – a record that has Wolf tightening it up a bit from his earliest years at Chess, and moving into a groove that would forever make him one of the key artists to record for the label! The raspy, rootsy feel of earlier years is still in place – but the recording quality's a bit better, and the tunes have a more unified feel – thanks partly to some classic compositions from Willie Dixon, whose work makes up a very big part of the album! Tunes were recorded between the years 1959 to 1962, and brought together for the record – and titles include "Shake For Me", "Spoonful", "Going Down Slow", "Down In The Bottom", "Wang Dang Doodle", "Red Rooster", and "Tell Me". On Moanin In The Moonlight, a set filled with raspy vocals, Wolf sings in a way that definitely lives up to his nickname! The sound here is spare and stripped down, with very little accompaniment – usually just a bit of guitar, piano, bass, and drums – and sometimes not even all that much! Wolf's vocals are wonderful throughout – archetypal, but not nearly as cliched as some of his contemporaries came to sound – with a timeless feel that really holds up throughout. Titles include "Smokestack Lightnin", "No Place To Go", "All Night Boogie", "Evil", "I Asked For Water", "Forty Four", and "Somebody In My Home". CD

Possible matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Albert KingKing Albert ... LP
Tomato, 1977. Very Good+ ... $8.99
A tight date from 1977, and one that follows nicely in the spirit of King's later Stax sides, but with a slightly smoother groove. There's a bit of the Detroit 70s mode going on in the set – that rough-and-smooth quality that you'd find on a Don Davis production, which proves to be a wonderful blend for King's music, especially on some of the album's funkier numbers. Titles include "Chump Change", "You Upset Me Babe", "Let Me Rock You", "Boot Lace", "Love Mechanic", "Call My Job", and "Good Time Charlie". LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has a cutout notch.)

Possible matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Magic SlimBorn On A Bad Sign (180 gram vinyl – with bonus download) ... LP
Storyville (Denmark), 1976. New Copy ... $16.99 24.99
Raw west side blues from the mighty Magic Slim – recorded a small club in Chicago, with a grittier quality than some of Slim's previous records! The guitar is beautifully out front in the mix – echoing out in the space of the club with these loud, lean lines – and Slim's vocals seem to have gotten even better over the years, with a richness of soul that really grabs us more than we remember – so much so that his singing may well rival his guitar on the record! The group also features Alabama Junior Pettis on guitar and added vocal, plus Nick Holt on bass, and Douglas Holt on drums – and titles include the funky "Slim's Bump", plus "Going Down Slow", "Born On A Bad Sign", "Rock Me Baby", and "Born Down The Bridge". LP, Vinyl record album
(Includes download!)

Possible matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Snooky PryorReal Fine Boogie – The JOB Records Masters ... CD
Fuel 2000, 1950s. Used ... $6.99
Classic work by one of the first and greatest harmonica players on the Chicago scene of the postwar years – the amazing Snooky Pryor, a player who took the humble instrument to territory that rivals that of the tenor or alto saxophone! Most numbers here have acoustic accompaniment on guitar and piano – and a rough-edged, back-room quality that's grittier than even the better-known Windy City work of the time – much more underground than work on Chess or Vee Jay. Titles include "Snooky & Moody's Boogie", "Telephone Blues", "Boogy Fool", "Hold Me In Your Arms", "Stop The Train Conductor", "Real Fine Boogie", and "Eighty Nine Ten". CD

Possible matches6
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Jimmy RogersChicago Bound ... LP
Chess, 1950s. Very Good ... $14.99
The title's an apt one here, as Jimmy Rogers was one of the many bluesmen who started out in the south, but headed to Chicago for greater fame – which was a good thing for Chess Records, who managed to come some of these great sides in the 50s! Rogers both sings and plays guitar – the later of which has a sometimes snakey quality that almost echoes a slight bit of jazz – a mode that recalls some of the inventions T Bone Walker was putting down at the time, but a little bit rootsier overall. Players on these sessions include Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Otis Spann, and Willie Dixon – and tracks include "Money Marbles & Chalk", "Ludella", "You're The One", "Back Door Friend", "I Used To Have A Woman", "Sloppy Drunk", "Blues Leave Me Alone", and "Walking By Myself". LP, Vinyl record album
(Italian 80s pressing, with border around the cover image.)

Possible matches7
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Lightnin HopkinsLightnin & The Blues – Lightnin Hopkins Sings A Collection Of American Folklore (Herald) ... LP
Herald, 1954. New Copy (reissue)... Just Sold Out!
Lightnin Hopkins at his best – a set that rings out with all his bold electric tones on the guitar, yet which also has the moody, stripped-down feel of a blues recording from a few decades before! The electricity really does a lot to deepen the tone – both in the echo from Hopkins' guitar, and in the way his vocals stretch out in the same space! There's no other backing at all – which makes for a moody feel, and a quality that lives up to the "folk" in the title – yet Lightnin also gives the whole thing a crackling sort of energy that's also very much in the best postwar blues mode. Titles include "Sick Feelin Blues", "Blues For My Cookie", "My Baby's Gone", "Lightnin's Special", "Nothin But The Blues", and "Don't Think Cause You're Pretty". LP, Vinyl record album
 
 
 



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