Vocalists — CDs

Singers we love -- from vintage torch to vocalese, scat, jazz poetry, standards, and more!




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Close matches: 5
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Blue Stars Of FranceLullaby Of Birdland & Other Famous Hits ... CD
Mercury/Five Four (UK), 1954. New Copy ... $3.99
A key link in the early career of Blossom Dearie – and a fab album of jazzy vocal tracks throughout! Before Blossom recorded some of her 50s sides for Verve in the US, she was living in France and working with The Blue Stars – a cool male/female jazz vocal group that went onto become the prototype for later acts like The Swingle Singers, Lambert Hendricks & Ross, and Les Double Six! This 1954 album by the group was actually a minor hit in the US, where their swinging harmony version of "Lullaby Of Birdland" crept up the charts for a few weeks. The album's even cooler than the hit, though, and has lots of groovy jazz vocal tracks in French, with the sort of vocalese harmony scatting that you probably already know from the more famous groups mentioned above. You can always pick out Blossom's distinctive voice in the group, but the real strength is the groovy group vocals – shining beautifully in one of the first great recordings of vocalese harmony! Tracks include "Gina", "Embrasse Moi Bien", "La Danse Du Baiser", "Toute Ma Joie", and a version of "Mister Sandman" that's been renamed "Mister L'Amour". CD

Close matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Connie FrancisSecond Hand Love & Other Hits ... CD
Mercury/Universal (Japan), 1962. New Copy ... $13.99
One of the more obscure albums from Connie Francis' strong 60s run on Mercury – and one of the best, too! Francis begins the album almost as a country singer – working a bit of Patsy Cline blueness into the record alongside Nashville-style piano lines. And as things progress, there's a bit more pop in the mix – but Francis still has this rich style that's surprisingly expressive, even when carefully balanced – way more than we remember from some of her crossover pop hits. We're not sure who handled arrangements, but the mix of rhythms, piano, and even sometime backing vocals definitely show a Nashville vibe – and titles include "Second Hand Love", "Dreamboat", "Breakin In A Brand New Broken Heart", "It Happened Last Night", "Don't Break The Heart That Loves You", and "Gonna Git That Man". CD

Close matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Bryony JamesFeeling Good ... CD
Mercury/Zeitgeist (UK), 1969. New Copy ... $16.99
A really groovy little vocal jazz record – cut by an American singer on the London scene of the late 60s – working here with tight backing from the Laurie Holloway Quartet! Bryony James has this way of going deep with her range that's a bit like Morgana King, but she's also a bit less heavy, too – and swings easily without getting lost in her trills – bringing a lightness to the record that's a great match for the cool arrangements provided by Holloway – whose group also includes a nice percussionist. Many tunes are familiar, but they're given very groovy treatments here – and tracks include "Our Day Will Come", "Feeling Good", "Summertime", "Goin Out Of My Head", "How Insensitive", "Come Back To Me", and "Look Of Love". CD

Close matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Blue Stars Of FranceLullaby Of Birdland ... CD
Mercury (Japan), 1954. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
A key link in the early career of Blossom Dearie – and a fab album of jazzy vocal tracks throughout! Before Blossom recorded some of her 50s sides for Verve in the US, she was living in France and working with The Blue Stars – a cool male/female jazz vocal group that went onto become the prototype for later acts like The Swingle Singers, Lambert Hendricks & Ross, and Les Double Six! This 1954 album by the group was actually a minor hit in the US, where their swinging harmony version of "Lullaby Of Birdland" crept up the charts for a few weeks. The album's even cooler than the hit, though, and has lots of groovy jazz vocal tracks in French, with the sort of vocalese harmony scatting that you probably already know from the more famous groups mentioned above. You can always pick out Blossom's distinctive voice in the group, but the real strength is the groovy group vocals – shining beautifully in one of the first great recordings of vocalese harmony! Tracks include "Gina", "Embrasse Moi Bien", "La Danse Du Baiser", "Toute Ma Joie", and a version of "Mister Sandman" that's been renamed "Mister L'Amour". CD

Close matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Louis JordanSomebody Up There Digs Me ... CD
Mercury (Japan), 1956. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
Somebody up there digs Louis Jordan – and we do too – thanks to the searing sound of these Mercury Records sides from the 50s! The approach here is a bit more rocking and R&B-influenced than Jordan's initial material – and Louis goes back to some classics, reworks their groove, and shows everyone that although he's one of the originators, he can still do it better than most! Sax lines and searing guitar parts really infuse the grooves with a lot of soul – and Jordan himself is impeccably charming and pretty darn groovy throughout! Titles include "Run Joe", "Early In The Morning", "Caldonia", "Is You Is Or Is You Ain't My Baby", "Beware Brother Beware", "I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town", and "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens". (Soul, Vocalists) CD
 
Possible matches: 1
Possible matches6
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Helen MerrillHelen Merrill In Tokyo/Helen Merrill Sings Folk ... CD
King (Japan), 1963. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
2 very obscure sessions from vocalist Helen Merrill – both recorded in Tokyo during the early 60s! The first half of the CD is from the album Helen Merrill In Tokyo – a wonderful small combo set arranged by drummer Takeshi Inomata, played by a combo that includes alto, baritone, and trumpet – all used in a cool and laidback mode that resonates nicely with Merrill's more familiar 50s sides on Mercury. Helen's in great form vocally – often singing in that almost-effortless mode that we love in her classic work – and titles include "It Never Entered My Mind", "Bewitched", "You Do Something To Me", "Teach Me Tonight", "Good Morning Heartache", and "My Favorite Things". Next up are 12 more tracks from Helen Merrill Sings Folk – a rare entry in the "jazz meets folk" style that was popular in the early 60s, and which is done here with a nice degree of subtlety. The tunes are all from folk sources, but get some gentle jazz reworkings by arrangers Norio Maeda and Masao Yogi – hardly folksy at all in their instrumentation, but spare and spacious enough to let Merrill dominate the tunes as if she were working alone. Highlights include 2 great Japanese folk tunes – "Lullaby Of Chugoku-Chiho" and "Lullaby Of Itsuki" – and other tracks include "Donna Donna", "Black Is The Color", "Motherless Child", and "Wayfarin Stranger". CD
 
 
 



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