Global Grooves — LPs

XUnusual grooves from around the globe -- Afro Funk, Bollywood soundtracks, Turkish rock, gamelan, ethnographic/field recordings, sitar sounds, and more!

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Possible matches: 3
Possible matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ OsibisaOsibisa ... LP
Decca, 1971. Very Good Gatefold ... $13.99
Although Osibisa were one of the most successful of the London-based Afro-funk groups, they were also one of the best. This cool first album is filled with (as the label says) "criss cross rhythms that explode with happiness". Translated, that means that the record's got lots of nice cuts that have African percussion, electric funk rhythm, and a fairly joyous groove. Tracks include "Akwaaba", "Oranges", "The Dawn", "Think About The People", and the groovy "Music For Gong Gong". LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has some wear and seam splitting.)

Possible matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Manu DibangoAmbassador ... LP
Mango, 1981. Used ... Temporarily Out Of Stock
A slightly confused effort from Manu Dibango's later years – sessions recorded in Paris, London, New York, and Kingston – which must have cost Island Records a bundle! There's an attempt here to change up Manu's groove a bit – one that brings a fair bit of reggae into the mix in place of Afro Funk, and which also goes for other looser tropical touches on other tunes. A number of tracks have backing vocals – by singers that include Gwen Guthrie and Ullanda McCullough – but the main focus is still on Manu's choppy saxes. Titles include "Happy Feeling", "Choc N Soul", "Night Jet", "Kumbale Style", and "Cava Chouia". LP, Vinyl record album

Possible matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ OsibisaHeads ... LP
MCA, 1972. Used Gatefold ... Out Of Stock
A really wonderful third album from Osibisa – and a record that really crystallizes the group's sound into a trademark blend of African roots and more progressive-styled jamming! There's a mode here that's perfect for the cross-cultural London of the post-colonial 70s – a style that brings many strands of music into the capital, and mixes them up with some of the headier styles going down at the time. Bits of highlife echo alongside more tribally-based percussion – but most of the instrumentation on the set also has a strong ear for jazzy changes, especially during the flute and keyboards passages that make the record so great. Titles include "Kokorokoo", "Che Che Kule", "Sweet Sounds", "Sweet America", and "Do You Know". LP, Vinyl record album
(Cover has light wear.)
 
 
 



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