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Partial matches: 5
Partial matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Jack BradshawSaturday Night Special – Honky Tonk Heroes ... CD
Bear Family (Germany), Late 50s. New Copy ... $19.99 27.99
Rare work from Jack Bradshaw – an artist who definitely earns the honky tonk hero tag in the title – not just for the endless hours he spent in small clubs and taverns, but also for the great blue-tinged, late night quality of his music! A lot of the best tracks here remind us of the music on Ray Price's classic Night Life album – and have a similar sense of the world after midnight, its longings and regrets, and its slow crawl to dawn as a time of redemption. Jack's short career is divided between work on the MarVel and Decca labels – included here along with notes on his life and session details too – and a set of tracks that include "Oh Careless Me", "My Heart My Heart", "Don't Tease Me", "Welcome Heart", "Men Are Weak", "Saturday Night Special", "Flirting With You", "I Got What You Need", and "Don't Cause Me To Hate You". CD

Partial matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
Karen Dalton1966 (plus download) ... LP
Delmore, 1966. New Copy ... $19.99
The third in a series of unearthed archival release of treasures by 60s folk singer, guitarist and banjo player Karen Dalton from Delmore Recordings – and it's also the third completely beautiful and revelatory Karen Dalton release from Delmore Recordings! For years, Dalton was best known by her peers in the early 60s folk community, particularly the Greenwich Village scene, where she was beloved by Dylan and other soon-to-be giants. Thanks in no small part to the great stuff brought to light by Delmore and the stellar Light In The Attic reissues, she's finally getting an audience beyond pivotal fellow musicians, which is truly thrilling. 1966 features songs recorded that year in her cabin in Summerville, Colorado – between the Green Rocky Road recordings of a few years earlier and the recordings that would make up her first official album, which wouldn't be released until '69. She's sometimes accompanied by Richard Tucker on guitar and vocal duets. Karen was infamously self-conscious on stage and in the studio, so these informal home recordings find her at her intimate, soulful best. Includes one the best versions of Tim Hardin's "Reason To Believe" we've ever heard, plus "Katie Cruel", "Cotton Eyed Joe", "Green Rocky Road", "God Bless The Childen", "Other Side To This Life", "Don't Make Promises", "Mole In The Ground", "Misery Blues", "Little Bit Of Rain" and more. Also includes excellent notes by Ben Edmonds. LP, Vinyl record album
(Vinyl version includes and 8" X 10" color portrait plus a code for digital download.)

Partial matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Karen DaltonIt's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You The Best (CD/DVD) ... CD
Megaphone (UK), 1969. New Copy CD & DVD ... $19.99
The 1969 debut studio album from Karen Dalton – one of the most unique voices of the 60s folk scene, and one of the most emotionally rich, blue & soulful – a heroine to many artists to come, and one of the (sadly) very few pieces of music she made in a professional studio she made in her lifetime! The album was made with producer Nikolas Venet, who worked with Fred Neil at the time, and the record shares some of that atmosphere, but Karen's voice is in its own realm. There's a bit of grit in her tone that makes her voice all the more beautiful if you ask us, and her vibrato really preys on the raw emotion. Her choice of material is great, too, with some Leadbelly and Jelly Roll Morton on the blusier side, but those songs come off in a raw, folksy vibe, too. Karen is finally getting her just respect for her voice all these years later, but it needs to be known that she was an excellent 12-string acoustic guitar player, too, and she could also handle the banjo – with additional guitar on the record by Dan Hankin, electric guitar by Kim King, electric bass by Harvey Brooks and percussion by Gary Chester. Titles include "In The Evening (It's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You The Best)", Fred Neil's "Little Bit Of Rain" and "Blues On The Ceiling", "Sweet Substitute", "Ribbon Bow", "I Love You More Thank Words Can Say", "Down On The Street (Don't You Follow Me Down)" and more. DVD features a handful of songs recorded in 1969 and 1970 – mostly just Karen herself on vocals and guitar! CD

Partial matches4
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Karen DaltonIt's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You The Best (180 gram pressing) ... LP
Light In The Attic, 1969. Used (reissue)... Temporarily Out Of Stock
The 1969 debut studio album from Karen Dalton – one of the most unique voices of the 60s folk scene, and one of the most emotionally rich, blue & soulful – a heroine to many artists to come, and one of the (sadly) very few pieces of music she made in a professional studio she made in her lifetime! The album was made with producer Nikolas Venet, who worked with Fred Neil at the time, and the record shares some of that atmosphere, but Karen's voice is in its own realm. There's a bit of grit in her tone that makes her voice all the more beautiful if you ask us, and her vibrato really preys on the raw emotion. Her choice of material is great, too, with some Leadbelly and Jelly Roll Morton on the blusier side, but those songs come off in a raw, folksy vibe, too. Karen is finally getting her just respect for her voice all these years later, but it needs to be known that she was an excellent 12-string acoustic guitar player, too, and she could also handle the banjo – with additional guitar on the record by Dan Hankin, electric guitar by Kim King, electric bass by Harvey Brooks and percussion by Gary Chester. Titles include "In The Evening (It's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You The Best)", Fred Neil's "Little Bit Of Rain" and "Blues On The Ceiling", "Sweet Substitute", "Ribbon Bow", "I Love You More Thank Words Can Say", "Down On The Street (Don't You Follow Me Down)" and more. LP, Vinyl record album
(Includes the poster and inserts.)
Also available It's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You The Best (CD/DVD) ... CD 19.99

Partial matches5
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Roscoe HolcombHigh Lonesome Sound ... CD
Smithsonian Folkways, 1965. Used ... Out Of Stock
Appalachian vocals and banjo tunes from great Roscoe Holcomb – mid 60s Folkways recordings with his gorgeously weary, soul stirring and sometimes otherworldly passionate voice commanding your attention and cutting real deep – and his banjo playing making a playful progressions underneath. Holcomb puts it all in that voice of his, an impressive, cutting instrument on its owns – and getting a lot of different sounds out of his banjo than many players of the era. Titles include "Wandering Boy", "Hook And Line", "Omie Wise"., "In The Pines", "Little Bessie", "Willow Tree", "Married Life Blues" and more. CD
 
 
 
 



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