Sound Library — CDs

XSound library funk, grooves, and breaks -- from Italy, France, England, and beyond -- on labels like KPM, DeWolfe, and Bruton!

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Possible matches: 3
Possible matches1
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Steve Gray, Johnny Pearson, & Keith MansfieldGood Life – Sophisticated Sounds From The Bruton Music Library 1978 to 1985 ... CD
Bruton Music/Vocalion (UK), Late 70s/Early 80s. New Copy ... Out Of Stock
Sophisticated sounds, indeed – pulled from a time when the British sound library scene was really moving to the next level – and finding a strong identity that was all their own! There's plenty of sound library funk in the mix here, but there's also some deeper sophistication too – a shift that's almost like the change that CTI brought to jazz funk in the 70s – collected from some of the best Bruton Music library albums of the late 70s! Keyboard lines abound, and the horn passages are pretty darn great too – often cool and compressed, and soaring out nicely with the music. Composers include Keith Mansfield, Steve Gray, Robert Folk, Johnny Pearson, David Lindup, and others – and titles include "Night Games", "Sunshine Drive", "Hazy Days", "Golden Groove", "Flying Bird", "Vacation", "Honeymoon", "Early Riser", "Billowing Sails", "Chique", and "Voulez Vous". CD

Possible matches2
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ VariousInner City Beat – Detective Themes, Spy Music & Imaginary Thrillers 1967 to 1975 ... CD
Soul Jazz (UK), Late 60s/Early 70s. New Copy CD & Book ... Out Of Stock
A killer collection of sound library funk from the UK – a scene that served up some of the rarest grooves of the 70s! The music is every bit as funky as American work from the early 70s – like records from CTI, or blacksploitation soundtracks – but most of it was never issued on vinyl at the time, as it was circulated only for use in film and television – recorded by an elite group of players for very limited use. The rarity is only part of the appeal, though – as the overall vibe is great – and the record has the same instantly appealing feel as other jazz, funk, and soul collections from the always-great Soul Jazz label. This time around, they do a great job of turning their ear towards the rich sound libraries of companies like KPM, DeWolfe, and Conroy – and come up with a double-length batch of funky instrumentals that includes "The Hell Raisers" and "Danger Musicians At Work" by Syd Dale, "Fuel Injection" and "Crossflow" by Ernest Copley, "Superformance" and "Men Of Action" by David Lindup, "Cross Talk" and "Funky Chimes" by Francis Coppieters, "Theme From New Scotland Yard" by Norrie Paramour, "Come One Come All" by Brass Incorporated, "Sparks" by Peter Reno & Barry Stoller, "Gotta Getaway" by Dave Richmond, "Transit" by Clive Hicks, "The Ratcatchers" by Tilsley Orchestral, "Grand Prix" by Johnny Pearson, and "Conveyer Belt" and "Workshop" by Johnny Hawksworth. CD
(Limited edition CD includes 60-page graphic novel!)

Possible matches3
CD, LP, Vinyl record album cover art
✨✧ Puccio RoelensMusica Per Commenti Sonori ... CD
Costanza/Schema (Italy), 1979. New Copy Gatefold ... Out Of Stock
A sound library album from the end of the 70s, but one that's got a fair bit of funky jazz in the mix, too – thanks to a lifetime dedication to the music by Amleto "Puccio" Roelens! Roelens was a musician with a long lineage on the Italian scene in the postwar years – and here, he's in great form at the helm of a tight electric combo – one that mixes sweet keyboard lines and riffing guitars with some warmer reed solos from time to time – in a way that's maybe a bit more of an abstract take on the CTI sound of the 70s! By that, we mean that there's no standout soloists or egos that get in the mix – but the instrumentation is nice and funky, and impeccably arranged and played throughout – with a great electric vibe that's more 1974 than you'd guess from the date of the record. Titles include "Cobwebs", "Rusty Letters", "Slip Back", "Lipstick", "Make Up", "Effuse", "Bus Stop", and "Leewards". CD
 
 
 



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